Monetizing a Smile and Driving a Parisian Taxi at the Same Time

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I have discovered that the Parisians are changing their attitude about service industries – the recent Parisian taxi drivers versus Uber Pop clash being a prime example. But others will come. The French client is demanding that the people who they pay dearly to drive them in, out and around this beautiful city of Paris should actually be nice. Believe me, this is a game changer.

This smile will become very common as taxi drivers "adjust" to client demand.
This smile will become very common as taxi drivers “adjust” to client demand.

I have been alternating between using official Parisian taxis and Uber-driven vehicles since the conflict began. I have French taxi driver friends and I can understand their frustration at having to pay a hefty fee (it could reach as much as 100,000 dollars) and suddenly having to compete with chauffeurs who have paid nothing for the privilege of transporting clients in France. It’s not fair but hey, what is?

Before Uber came along, the cab drivers upheld their sterling reputation of being grouchy, unavailable and super-selective on whom they put in their cab (I’ve seen them refuse babies…and allow dogs). Almost every Parisian I know has a nasty cab story to tell. Some chauffeurs don’t have change for a fifty euro bill but do not accept credit cards. They add on charges for suitcases and early pick-up times. They come ten minutes earlier than their appointed time; start the meter and charge you extra for being on time.

Parisian taxis blocking the road in one of several "Uber Go Home" demonstrations.
Parisian taxis blocking the road in one of several demonstrations.

They go on strike fairly often, holding the customers hostage. Trying to find a cab in Paris in the rain is tantamount to waiting for hell to freeze over. The client was not “king” of the road when it came to taxis. The drivers made all the choices. Take it or leave it. Their government-backed monopoly gave them wings. Ah, but in the commercial sky of free enterprise, those wings are flapping out of control.

Taxi services will change in France because the attitude of the consumer is changing. Thanks to the likes of Uber, LeCab and other private vehicle start-ups, the French now have choices. And they are finding that having a smiling driver is a good thing. There is no longer any reason to “put up” with bad service. Now, they can leave it and get something better in its place. If I were a French taxi driver, I would read the writing on the wall really quickly – and make a uturn into the waiting arms of Uber or any other private transportation company. If you can’t beat them, join them.

I took an Uber a couple of weeks ago and was surprised to hear the chauffeur’s story. He is a bona fide Parisian taxi driver but he’s young and internet savvy and figured it out before his colleagues did. He has put his French taxi license up for sale and, in the meantime, he’s driving for Uber. He likes how easy it is – says he has more freedom over his life and he actually enjoys meeting his clients and making sure they are satisfied with his service. I was amazed – a French person wanting to provide good customer service is as rare as a three-euro bill here. But this new attitude will multiply. It has to or the French taxi drivers will just go out of business. Pure and simple.

I am looking forward to this impending change in attitude in taxi drivers.

We lile Parisian taxis but we're gonna love them when they start being nice!
We like Parisian taxis but we’re gonna love them when they start being nice!

It’ll be a lot more fun when the Frenchman taking me for a ride has a smile on his face. It doesn’t matter if he’s driving for Uber or for Parisian taxis. He will be nice because he finally understood that being nice has its advantages – the biggest of which will be his pay check. He will be smiling all the way to the bank.

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